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Archive for the ‘Ubuntu’ Category

There’s an annoying bug that don’t permit to make a fresh install of gutsy on some machines without having really big fonts, that makes the system unusable. it seems that’s a bug in the dpi detection and there are a few ways to resolve this, for example copy your monitor characteristics from xorg.conf from feisty, and forcing dpi for the gdm, this might solve every problem.

but there’s a much simpler way to get it to work well at least on my intel gma…
first of all make a backup copy of your xorg.conf, this way you can get it back if something goes wrong

cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.bak

sudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf

and find these lines:

Section “Device”
Identifier “Intel Corporation … Express Graphics Controller”
Driver “intel”

change the Driver “Intel” line to

Driver “i810”

save and reboot. if everything’s fine and i810 is the right driver for your intel gma, you should have a good resolution for your fonts.

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Installed Virtual Box 1.5.2, I immediately noticed that the fonts of the window were too big, if you experienced the same problem or you just want to get a better integration of Qt applications with Gnome here are some simple steps to follow.

First let’s install Qt3 configuration editor and polymer, a port of the “Plastik” KDE theme which doesn’t depend on KDE libraries.

sudo apt-get install qt3-qtconfig polymer

Ok now open Qt3 Configuration from System menu (qtconfig-qt3 from bash) and select Polymer style.

Polymer

Now open the font tab and select a Sans font like this:

fonts

Save from menu and close Qt3 Configuration. Give a look to your Qt3 applications, they’ll look very different ;)

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Powertop is an utility from Intel that finds software components that use more power than necessary and provides some tips to make battery life lasts longer.

On Ubuntu you can install it from synaptic sudo apt-get install powertop
On other linux systems you’ll have to compile it.

http://www.linuxpowertop.org/

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There are a lot of improvements since the last version this software is growing really fast, that’s the power of open source ;)

From prompt:
wget -q http://www.virtualbox.org/debian/innotek.asc -O- | sudo apt-key add –

You should see “OK

sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list

and put at the end of the file

deb http://www.virtualbox.org/debian gutsy non-free

then:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install virtualbox

remember to add your user to vboxusers group, and now happy virtualization to everyone ;)

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Yesterday I was searching a way to create and use img files using linux, and found a few simple commands that do the job.

Create a disk image from the phisical drive:
cat /dev/fd0 > imagefile.img

Copy image to the phisical drive:
cat imagefile.img > /dev/fd0

Simple isn’t it? And now the fun part :P
If we need it we can create an empty image and mount it using linux’s loop devices.

Creating the image:
$ dd bs=512 count=2880 if=/dev/zero of=imagefile.img
$ mkfs.msdos imagefile.img

Mounting it:
$ sudo mkdir /media/floppy1/
$ sudo mount -o loop floppy.img /media/floppy1/

Alternatively with a path as suggested by Anders Lennqvist in a comment to this post

Create a disk image from a physical diskette:
cat /dev/fd0 > /path/imagefile.img

Copy the image to a diskette:
cat /path/imagefile.img > /dev/fd0

There’s an even easier way to do this using mkfs.msdos, skipping the need for the dd command. Also, on my system, mkfs.msdos is in the /sbin directory, which is not usually in a user’s path. So, the new command is

Create an empty floppy image of 1.44 MB:
$ /sbin/mkfs.msdos -C /path/imagefile.img 1440

Simple isn’t it? And now the fun part :P
If we need it we can create an empty image-file and mount it using linux’s loop devices.
Creating an empty floppy image: (here 1.44MB)
$ dd bs=512 count=2880 if=/dev/zero of= /path/imagefile.img
Format it:
$ mkfs.msdos /path/imagefile.img

Mounting it:
$ sudo mkdir /media/floppy1/
$ sudo mount -o loop /path/imagefile.img /media/floppy1/

Thank you Anders!

Salena Vorik pointed out here a disk image can be created in an easier way:

There’s an even easier way to do this using mkfs.msdos, skipping the need for the dd command. Also, on my system, mkfs.msdos is in the /sbin directory, which is not usually in a user’s path. So, the new command is

Create an empty floppy image of 1.44 MB:
$ /sbin/mkfs.msdos -C /path/imagefile.img 1440

Thank you Salena!

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